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Platforms

Desktop

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Chocolatey Comments

Some packages could take years to update.

Comment by coth
about Chocolatey · Feb 2017 · Helpful Not helpful Report as spam

Paint.net, for example, is 4.0.6, while at the moment there is 4.0.13. Double Commander is 0.7.7, while at the moment it is 0.7.8. NAPS2 is 0.3.0, while at the moment it is 0.3.3. etc etc. That's the main problem with it.

Another problem is source of installations. Chocolatey only saves scripts. Apps are downloaded from 3rd party sites. Things could change, yet Chocolatey scripts won't update.

New ChocolateyGUI (kind of Synaptic Package Manager for Chocolatey) isn't practical either. Too much graphics and uncomfortable UI.

reply

These complaints seem related to the community package repository and not to Chocolatey itself.

Paint.net, for example, is 4.0.6, while at the moment there is 4.0.13. Double Commander is 0.7.7, while at the moment it is 0.7.8. NAPS2 is 0.3.0, while at the moment it is 0.3.3. etc etc. That's the main problem with it.

I'm supposing this is related to the Chocolatey community package repository - you are likely aware you can add additional sources and create your own packages here?

Another problem is source of installations. Chocolatey only saves scripts. Apps are downloaded from 3rd party sites. Things could change, yet Chocolatey scripts won't update.

This is definitely related to distribution rights, something a public repository like the community package repository would be constrained by. Internally you can include the binaries in packages as much as you want. This is covered in detail at https://chocolatey.org/docs/community-packages-disclaimer :

Chocolatey is the best option for software management, as long as you are using package repository sources you can rely on.

A huge thing in Windows ecosystem is copyright law and how it plays into distribution rights. Most software in POSIX-land (Linux) is open source friendly, which has friendly redistribitution rights (redist). So you can embed that software directly in the package and publicly offer it. In Windows that is not the case - an organization like Microsoft would get very upset if the Office 365 packages on the public Community Package Repository actually contained the Office 365 binaries. That creates an enormous failure point that is outside of the package's control when it needs to download files at install time (that dependency on internet-available files that are hoped to always be available, but in practice they are not).

You can build a 100% reliable pipeline/workflow within the Chocolatey framework, just not with the community package repository. Building a reliable pipeline is huge. If you are a Windows admin wanting to trust a framework like Chocolatey, you are not going to use the Community Package Repository. Not when your reputation/job is on the line for picking the best options.

New ChocolateyGUI (kind of Synaptic Package Manager for Chocolatey) isn't practical either. Too much graphics and uncomfortable UI.

Did you provide feedback to the team at https://github.com/chocolatey/ChocolateyGUI? They are open to suggestions and are working to make the interface better (the blue-themed interface is much better than the older one). We all like actionable feedback, it's hard to move forward if folks don't give us a heads up.

It's a continual work in progress. Chocolatey is a continually evolving framework - as more folks can work full time on Chocolatey (as the company grows), you will see more dedicated and faster moving progress on these things.