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Vivaldi Browser Comments

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Comment by Jay_K_Slider
about Vivaldi Browser · Apr 2015 · Helpful Not helpful 1 Helpful

I hope everyone commenting on this realizes Vivaldi is only in a tech preview state and nowhere near finished.

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Another Chromaldi

Comment by Azazel
about Vivaldi Browser and Mozilla Firefox · Feb 2015 · Helpful Not helpful 2 Helpful

Guys & gals, there's no need for any Vivaldis, just go with FIrefox. Faster than ever it is now, customizable and open source. What the heck else do one need from a web browser?
Anyway, I'll be satisfied if this project pulls some of ChrOpera's blanket.

Firefox is an adequate {just adequate}browser - after i add several add-ons to match what Opera had some years ago.

However, Opera has lost me with the Chrome-based version - not so much because of the Chrome aspect as because they screwed with the UI in ways that made it less usable.

Vivaldi, from the original Opera team, looks as if it'll finally replace Opera 12.6

... and the return of things like the integrated email client is something that has been missing from modern browsers for a while (Opera pre-12.16/Netscape/Mozilla/SeaMonkey)

I love Firefox, I do, but it's just so sloooow by comparison to Opera/Chrome/Vivaldi. I use it at work and the difference even in things like page loading, UI responsiveness, etc is noticeable.

@GTLC
Slowness can be caused by some extensions. Or, based on my experience, also if you have installed some of the "Complete Themes," it can be the reason of UI performance drops.
I have installed a few extensions (the heaviest of which on system resources is Adblock Plus) but still my Firefox (v.37) performs just as fast as any Chromium browser in terms of both interface and page loading and rendering speed. Even if there are some noticeable differences in performance, they are not that significant to be the turning point from opensourced and customizable Firefox to shady and restricted in many ways Chrome/Opera/Vivaldi.

No, I don't accept that.

"Slowness can be caused by extensions" is the browser equivalent of "startup apps can slow down windows startup" which in my experience isn't always the case.

My installation of Opera has a fair few extensions and is still as crisp and responsive as it was when I installed that particular version (beta 29). Multiple versions of Firefox (the latest being v39, x64), even when no extensions were installed, felt slower and more plodding by comparison. I can't say it's gotten much worse. My girlfriend moaned so much about it she installed Chrome and even I was surprised by how much speedier it was.

I've tried some of the 'optimised' x64 variants, like Waterfox, but I think it's the underlying tech. It's slick and very capable, just not the quickest.

I honestly shared my personal experience; you can either use this information to try and solve you issues or keep using closed-source spyware, it's up to you.
My 2+ years of observations tell me that most of the time in order to speed up your Firefox you have to disable some extensions or play a little bit with the settings, that's it. There is also the hardware factor, obviously. I'm not sure, but Firefox might be using swap file more actively than RAM in comparison with Chrome, so it might operate a lot faster on a system installed on an SSD, as in my case. Also some time ago I used to clear my cache when I felt like Firefox had gotten slower, and it helped. I believe it was before I switched to SSD.

I'm using several different browser regularly, and Firefox remains my main and favourite one so far, for various reasons. But in my experience it's quite clearly the slowest and most resource-hungry of them all, even out of the box without any extensions.

One of the main problems with it is that it leaks memory right, left and center, and has done so for as long as I can remember. I'm working a lot with tabs, usually anywhere from 5 to a few dozen, and Firefox eats massive amounts of memory and quite simply never seems to free any of it. The result is that Firefox needs regular restarts, otherwise it starts freezing intermittently, or crashing when it reaches the 32-bit process memory limit, which happens quite often for me. (You can alleviate it somewhat by going to about:memory and manually performing garbage collection and freeing unused memory; heaven knows why it never does that automatically, because it's quick and effective.)

I have some hopes that the multi-process architecture will alleviate some of those problems, but according to official Mozilla statements, it will still be a long time before that makes it into Firefox releases. Chrome does have it, and prevents the problems I have with Firefox, as closing a tab means everything is actually gone. At the moment I'm not sure how Vivaldi handles it, I don't use it heavily enough to notice how it performs in long and big sessions.

We’re not all utterly mentally limited, dear Azazel.
Mozilla has gone certifiably mentally insane. After a 3-hour discussion with the head developers, that becomes completely clear.
Firefox used to be about a minimal core, with maximum configurability and every add-on you could not even dream of.
But it soon became as large and sluggish as the old Mozilla (SeaMonkey). I didn’t mind, as the add-ons were above and beyond!
But now, more and more crap creeps in, and the developers are obsessed with patronizing the user and assuming he is a complete and utter idiot. … until he actually is!
The only reason anyone is staying with Firefox, is because of those add-ons. Which they are now ruining partially too.
Anything that can offer similar configurability, and all the add-ons I have installed, will result in bloody Firefox murder quicker than you can blink.

Mozilla could still save itself. By kicking out the iDiots that are obsessed with simplification and have apparently never heard of the “inner-platform effect” and really truly want to make Firefox into a large operating system that has everything, except for a good browser. And then by creating a lightweight fully configurable core again, and putting everything else (including WebGL, and similar nonsense) into add-ons where it belongs.

Vivaldi, on the other hand, is on the up exactly because it contains all those things that Firefox badly cloned from Opera. Including tabs, mouse gestures (that are actually not stuttering, yes, dear Mozilla!), but also the lightweight core with a focus on configurability.
Might be not there yet, but it very clear where things are going to be in a few years.

@Evi1M4chine_
Well let me know when it's "there", OK? Until then I'm sticking with FF; and not just because of the addons but because of the overall UX, which is shaped by many little (and not so much) things that add up. Besides, they are bringing in new features as we speak, and have already introduced a pretty solid reader mode. I believe that's what many people do on the internet -- they read stuff, right?

@Azazel: You mean that utterly idiotic new UI that removed the menu, status bar, etc, in favor of tablet nonsense? If you think those changes “add up”, then there really is no hope for you, and I must assume you’re a big Apple fan.
And I say that as someone, who also still uses Firefox, but only for lack of a better choice.

What menu are you talking about? The one that shows up with Alt keystroke? And Apple fans use Safari and Chrome, I'm really having a hard time understanding what the hell are you talking about there...

FIrefox is the browser i RELUCTANTLY use if Opera 12.7 can't handle a page.

No other browser has caught up to Opera 12 yet (including the thing currently called Opera).

Vivaldi is the closest to Opera Classic, and it's not there yet.

[Edited by horkstowe1, March 21]

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Slow to start up but...

Comment by niklasbjrkr
about Vivaldi Browser · May 2017 · Helpful Not helpful

Still just as good as google chrome and opera

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NOT vulnerable to Unicode phishing scam

Comment by garychike
about Vivaldi Browser · Apr 2017 · Helpful Not helpful

Vivaldi, although based on Chromium, is not vulnerable like Chrome is to the Unicode text phishing scam.

https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/google-chrome-firefox-phishing-scam-183049337.html

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Comment by mts1715
about Vivaldi Browser · Apr 2017 · Helpful Not helpful

Great browser for job, especially when you work with many tabs (it's possible to make tabs in left side like in firefox, but vivaldi has chromium engine).

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Comment by CodeMouse92
about Vivaldi Browser · Apr 2017 · Helpful Not helpful

This is my favorite web browser - I can customize it to look and behave EXACTLY the way I want. It also has the best support of dark GTK themes (on Linux) of any browser I've ever used.

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Welcome Vivaldi

Comment by RoseMerlin
about Vivaldi Browser · Apr 2015 · Helpful Not helpful

But, it means additional browser to test...

No, I don't think there's any necessity to test in every Chromium browser. One (Chrome) should do for all of them.

@ Azazel, that's what I thought too - but then a customer noticed that Torch was rendering their website incorrectly. Specifically, the background was out of place and, in their words, "there's a white bar at the bottom of the page." Google Chrome rendered the website as intended, and so did every other browser I had tested it on.

Interesting... Thanks for the heads-up

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