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CudaText Reviews

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Like many, I'm currently moving from Windows to Linux, so I am actively looking for Linux replacements for my trusty Windows apps. One such is my programmer's editor. It's an open-source project called AkelPad and it's been a great text editor... but there won't ever be a native Linux version and running it under Wine is suboptimal at best. I've looked long and hard for a fully open-source replacement and the best I came up with for (my XFCE-based) Linux boxes is geany. It's by no means a bad text editor but there are quite a few things I miss and others I don't like. I alleviated some of these things by using geany's plugins but it was less than ideal.
Enter CudaText. This editor definitely looks and feels like the open source community's answer to SublimeText. It's a programmer's editor as opposed to a fully-blown IDE (of which I am not a great fan, no least because they tend to be slow and bloated). CudaText sports all the usual buzzwords and high-level features a powerful programmer's editor should offer: full column editing, multiple carets, regular expressions throughout, code folding, multiple buffers and tabs, speed, fully configurable menus and keyboard shortcuts, keyboard macros, a fully-blown Python3-based plugin system (with hundreds of plugins ranging from easier stuff like VIM emulation or sessions to more complex things like spell-checking and project managing).
CudaText works on many platforms including MacOS, Windows, various Linux distros, Solaris as well as Free-, Net- and OpenBSD. It supports text snippets, various line-endings, more character encodings than I care for, lexers and autocompletion for HTML, CSS and most programming languages (and a relatively simple way to create new lexers), UI theming, a minimap for overview and quickly jumping around. Basically, think of a feature and chances are CudaText already supports it (or there's at least a plugin which does).
But if not... the good news is that CudaText's developer, Alexey Torgashin (like AkelPad's creator a Russian) is willing to listen to suggestions and eager to add new features. In fact, he sometimes does so within a couple of days. He also releases new versions refreshingly fast: just check the release history on https://github.com/Alexey-T/CudaText/releases and lurk on the forum (http://synwrite.sourceforge.net/forums/index.php ) for a week. In fact, the friendly forum is a great resource for all things CudaText especially for newcomers; another is the long and detailed wiki on https://wiki.freepascal.org/CudaText .
If CudaText is so great, are there any downsides? Yes, there are. Because it's such a beast of an editor, getting to know it and its many features is not something done in two minutes. More importantly, having it configured to one's liking is not trivial either. The complete configuration is stored in a set of simple .ini or .json files, so if need be literally everything can be changed by editing these files even if many elements of the configuration (for instance the UI theming, important parts of the lexer configuration and the keyboard shortcuts) can be changed from within nice GUI dialogs. However, a big chunk of the configuration has to be done by going through a not very sophisticated options dialog. I personally found it easier to forego this dialog by directly editing the main configuration file. On the positive side though, configuration files can be shared across platforms, so once you're done on one platform it'll behave exactly the same on any other supported platform.
Another weak point is the powerful plugin system: in itself this is a godsend because it allows anyone who knows a bit of Python to create a new (or adapt an existing) plugin. However, with hundreds of plugins available (see https://github.com/CudaText-addons ) it's probably inevitable that the quality varies from very good to mediocre. I ran into problems with a couple of plugins but to the credit of Alexey and the CudaText forum community these were dealt with quickly.
If all this just sounds too good to be true... well, don't take my word for it! If you're a developer or otherwise need powerful cross-platform text editing, CudaText may be a near perfect fit. Just check it out yourself: http://uvviewsoft.com/cudatext/ .

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Absolutely amazing program! Light, powerful, beautiful, stable... Highly recommended.

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  • Lightweight multi platform text editor
  • beginner friendly: many editing functions can also be used via command palette and menu
  • plugin support
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Dark themes are not looking nice because of ugly windows menu-bar can't be removed. For me it's a dealbreaker.

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