3.5 out of 5 with 53 ratings

Opera Reviews

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opera was sold to Chinese few years ago. Don't put sensitive data to this browser. They paid 600 million so they want profit... Just think

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Can you clarify that with a link or public statement of the company itself? A pure statement doesn't say anything :\ - still though it's helpful. It's (sadly) not the first time I heard of this…


Opera is Undead: Long Live Vivaldi!

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After using Presto Opera since version 8.5, I was horrified by the lobotomised version of Opera presented in v15. I agreed completely with the need for a change of engine but Opera's new direction threw out most of what made the Presto version a true classic and a joy to use. Two years later and it STILL feels like it barely compares to version 8 of Opera Classic, let alone version 12.

It's a freakish abomination that abandoned its core user-base, along with all the beloved community features and mail, in favour of some nebulous idea about "popularity". (something that seems not to have worked at all, based on these results: http://clicky.com/marketshare/global/web-browsers/ )

I've stuck with it in the desperate hope that some glimmer of the original spirit would return...and I'm happy to report that it finally has! BUT NOT IN OPERA.

Enter: Vivaldi! (https://vivaldi.com/#Home )

Created by the original CEO of Opera, Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner, (who left the company shortly before the awful change in direction), Vivaldi simply is - in spirit - everything that Opera was, only modernised to use Blink (The feature-set will be what Opera was, but many are not yet present). The community is already back. Mail is on the way.Innovation is already present (I fully expect everyone else to start copying the Tab Colours soon, just like old times!) For me, this is the final shotgun blast to the head of the shambling zombie horror that was once an amazing browser; Opera remains Opera in name only, having long since lost its soul.

[Edited by GTLC, February 16]

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I don't use Opera anymore because the company is now acting as a loan shark in poor countries.

Hindenburg Research reported several issues with their financial data, looks like the CEO and other managers are taking money away from Opera to other companies they own using shady, blatant false, information to cover up. The switch from Presto to Chromium was bearable and I didn't see anything inherently bad in the Chinese acquisition as I'm not xenophobic but this is too much.

It's very sad but the fat lady has sung.
I recommend Vivaldi on desktop and Yandex browser on mobile because it's the most similar with the bottom UI and text wrap, Vivaldi mobile doesn't have these features yet. Vivaldi is strictly against opening to shareholders controlling them which is a plus. Firefox is a good alternative if you want to support a non-profit project that cares about open web standards, they develop the Gecko engine as a contender to Google and Apple's dominance.

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Opera was once my all time favorite browser.
After it changed to chromium, it was just a random browser.

But now, Opera has become bloatware. Using opera, you become once in a while ads from Opera! not from the website. From the browser itself!! And you can't turn it off!

RIP Opera

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Opera has the tag 'virtual-private-network', and it includes a VPN, but it is still primarily a web browser. I would prefer a VPN separate from the web browser.

https://www.opera.com/features/free-vpn

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Opera used to be a good browser years ago, until 2013, when they switched from their Presto layout engine, to Chrome's engine. Then a few years later, they were bought by the Chinese. Don't use this browser. Consider Vivaldi or Pale Moon instead.

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To be clear this is a good browser.

Pros:

  • Black UI theme
  • Good Dial Panel where you can easily add sites what you wish
  • The picture in Picture out the box
  • Pretty fast

Cons:

  • No full sync (add-ons, bookmarks, settings)
  • Work with bad providers which blocked in different countries because of spyware (Yandex for example)
  • They continue to grow their own opera extension market, which is a super bad idea, all add-ons very old there.

Use it on your own risk.

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Sell·out

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Officially Opera gets its main revenue from having Google as it's default search engine... but my theory is that Opera Software is getting paid to stay away from the browser race. How else can they completely ditch v12 for this generic excuse of a browser?

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Let's see your theory be destroyed when the Opera 15+ userbase hits a higher number than the Opera 12.x userbase soon.

Well, It's just a theory (not in the scientific way), and even if it was proven wrong it wouldn't mean it was a bad theory. I even keep hope that Opera will be good for my use again, but the circumstance you are projecting won't prove anything at all. Opera 12 is lacking maintenance and losing compatibility with some websites, so it's only normal that users are regretably moving on.

I highly doubt that Opera 15+ will ever gain more users than Opera +12 did. Maybe if they implement some of the 12's features, than yes, probably. Other than that, I can't see why would someone go for Opera over Chrome when they are basically the same thing except that Opera 15+ lacks some of the Chrome's main features like
bookmarks, site settings and Chrome's extensions (although I heard that you can install those extensions on Chropera too somehow

Azarel this is not true, read my review.

rluik you are obviously an Opera's employee or something worse. Most of what you have listed is achievable in other browsers with extensions/addons. 'Off-road' (I guess it's ex-Opera Turbo) might be the only feature that can't be compensated anywhere else but in Opera but that's it; you must be either an advertiser or just outta your mind to call this useless piece of junk 'the best browser'.

I'm not an Opera employee, common don't be a kid pretending to "win" the discussion this way. If I was nothing would change in this conversation.

By your logic why do various browsers exist at all? There should be just 1 and you load it with a dozen of extensions, by your logic.

Listen to reason. Why would I want to install various extensions in another browser if I can have a much better experience with Opera from the start? They're commonly also the inventors of the referred features so using it supports and gives merit to the right people.

I also choose Opera because of their ideology and actions, not only functions.

I'm not a huge fan of extensions either, that's why I'm staying on real Opera (12.16) that has been discontinued.
Although Chropera has some more or less useful features such as mouse gestures out of the box, it lacks vital stuff, like 'normal' bookmarks and the bookmarks manager, not to mention site settings. Maybe if the only site you visit on the Internet is Facebook, then Chropera is the ideal option, but that's not my case for sure.

I also choose Opera because of their ideology and actions

their recent actions seem to be killing the best [geek] browser and replacing it with some three-button fugazy, killing their mail service and the user community - not much to choose for if you ask me.

it lacks vital stuff, like 'normal' bookmarks and the bookmarks manager, not to mention site settings

What's vital for you might be worthless for me and vice versa.
Mouse gestures are just the tip of the iceberg. There are obviously a bunch of different functions in Opera 15+ that'd require me to pack Chrome and Firefox with a lot more extensions (and again using Opera is giving merit to the people who really brought the features first).

Maybe if the only site you visit on the Internet is Facebook, then Chropera is the ideal option, but that's not my case for sure.

This is bogus. Opera can access any sites here, not just Facebook.

their recent actions seem to be killing the best [geek] browser and replacing it with some three-button fugazy, killing their mail service and the user community - not much to choose for if you ask me.

Well I was talking about things like supporting true open web standards, like the absence of and opposition to NaCl, etc.

The My Opera mail service and the social network will be closed, but the user community will continue in the forums and official blogs.

I too doubt that Opera 15+ is ever going to attract as many users again as it had up to version 12. Opera might have peaked at a market share of "only" around 2%, but that was still in the double-digit millions, and its user base was very loyal due to the unique set of features the browser offered. The power users, which they now so blatantly dismiss in official communications, were a large part of those 2%. Over the past year, they have completely alienated this established user base by removing most of those unique features. This user base has left almost completely by now, after their failure to deliver even on their most basic promises for the new browser. What's left would be new users, but as Azazel pointed out, why would they choose Opera over Chrome now? Under the hood it's the same, just with fewer features. The engine is the same, the interface is the same, the extensions are the same; maybe you'd prefer Opera if you like it's logo better, but other than that there really isn't much of a point anymore. They are both free, and Opera has nowhere near the resources to compete against Google in a browser marketing race.

Also, I don't think you can really refer to Opera's ideology and culture, or their innovating many now-common features, in this discussion anymore. All of this relates to the pre-v15 Opera Software. From what I hear, the development team that is working on the new Opera consists of almost none of the people who worked on the original version (and far fewer in total). I don't think the people you're giving merit by using the new Opera are who you think they are. Apart from the company name or logo, it doesn't really have much in common with the Opera of old anymore.

As for the bigger picture, "never rewrite your code from scratch" has been an iron law in software development probably for decades now. Apart from very specific, exceptional circumstances, it is always the wrong decision, because code turns out a certain way for a reason, and mostly what you'll achieve is just to repeat the entire painful, buggy growing and learning process, taking magnificently much longer than if you had refactored your existing code base. Opera aren't the first to make this mistake, but it's the latest major proof that the rule still holds.

[Edited by Anamon, February 03]

This user base has left almost completely by now

Nope, look the latest financial reports which include the number of users. They also observe more users are sticking with Opera instead of abandoning it after trying it for the first time.
http://my.opera.com/community/forums/findpost.pl?id=15143942

just with fewer features (...) the interface is the same

You're very uninformed or blind if you think that.
You can look my review in this site for example... Forum

From what I hear, the development team that is working on the new Opera consists of almost none of the people who worked on the original version (and far fewer in total)

You've been hearing from people spreading rumors and FUD.
"_Just to put an end to these rumors once and for all: The same people are still working on the desktop browser. Some of us have been here for more than 10 years. The difference, perhaps, is that we have more people now than we used to. That's how we can do proper integration on all platforms. We actually have the resources to do a properly integrated user interface now.

Of course, people come and go. There were several rounds of layoffs under Jon as well. That's life when you need to make money to stay in business.

I know that certain former employees have been spreading false rumors, helped by false information in the media, but it is perhaps time to listen to those who actually know what's going on._" - Haavard from Opera Software.

"never rewrite your code from scratch" has been an iron law in software development probably for decades now

So Opera is breaking the rules! Now it feels much more attractive and innovative. :)

Now it feels much more attractive and innovative. :)

Yeah, as innovative as Torch, Yandex Browser and a hell ton of other Chrome clones with plus-minus a few features.

Nope, look the latest financial reports which include the number of users.

The link you provided doesn't work, so I googled for the latest Opera Financial Report, Q4 2013. It says: "Desktop users reached 51 million by the end of 4Q13, down 7% versus the end of 4Q12." Yes, I overstated for dramatic effect, but people are leaving. I contrast this to your statement from 2-3 months ago where you expected Opera Next's userbase to surpass the highest that Opera 12 ever had.

As I said, Opera had a small but relatively notable and stable market share. I maintain my view that it was mainly power users who held that quota (and people who had power users set up their systems), and the reasons why those people chose Opera are no longer applicable to Opera Next. As the data in the financial reports doesn't seem to broken down by version of the client, forgive me for recognising the possibility that a considerable percentage of those 51 million users are ones who are still on Opera 12, and wouldn't consider switching to Next in its current state.

You're very uninformed or blind if you think that. You can look my review in this site for example...

I'm not relying on third-party information for this, but from being a heavy user of Chrome, and having been a heavy user of Opera up to version 12, while also having given my best effort to try and like/use several versions of Opera Next. Feature sets are a very subjective question, depending on what any given person has use for, so maybe there aren't objectively fewer features than in Chrome. But personally, I stand by my statement. The last time I gave Opera Next another go was with the intention of seeing whether I could use it to replace Chrome as my alternative browser beside Firefox. I'm sorry I don't remember the particular items I missed, but I ended up heavy-heartedly dismissing it as a viable alternative. I remember trying to find some advanced customisation options, unsuccessfully trying to achieve some things I missed compared to Chrome. I will take notes next time I give Opera Next a spin. (I'm sure I will. I'm still irrationally attached to the brand.)

What I do know objectively is the huge drop in functionality compared to classic Opera, where that was its unique selling point. That it takes time to reimplement stuff, as seems to be Opera's official stance, is no excuse -- it's one of the reasons why you don't do rewrites. You always lose more than you gain. Breaking rules of common business sense is not innovative, it's bad management.

Speed Dial is but slightly more configurable than in Chrome. Off-Road is just rebranded Turbo. That mouse gestures are still there is nice. Stash, if it's compatible with your browsing style. All the other features mentioned in your review are extremely minor, so forgive me for personally taking this as confirmation that there truly isn't that much else anymore. While the original Opera would have clearly been considered the more powerful, customizable, all-inclusive solution compared to Chrome (even if that would've made mainstream users rather stick to Chrome), there's no way you could say the same thing about Opera Next. It's the most radical change in what user base the product is targetted at. The problem is that the new market is already very crowded, including two of the most powerful and deep-pocketed corporations in the world, Google and Microsoft.

I searched around a bit about the internal Opera situation. There seems to have been some false information spread initially, then a corrective statement from Opera, then some cooler heads figured out that the truth lay somewhere in the middle. You seem to know more about this, so I'll believe you. In the end, it's not the number of coders that matter to the user, but the product they turn out. You'd have to forgive people for suspecting a much-reduced development team though -- classic Opera was a massive beast of a software (and I mean that in the most positive sense), while Opera Next feels mostly like a Chromium fork with minor improvements.

A well-intentioned tip: I hope you don't understand "integrated user interface" the way Google does, forcing their designed-for-touchscreen ChromeOS paradigm onto all platforms, overriding all native OS widgets and functionality. Another reason why I'm increasingly intent on ditching Chrome. Opera Next has so far steered clear of this usability fauxpas.

[Edited by Anamon, March 06]

"Desktop users reached 51 million by the end of 4Q13, down 7% versus the end of 4Q12." Yes, I overstated for dramatic effect, but people are leaving.
More people were leaving in the Presto days.

60 million in 1st quarter of 2012, 52 in 2nd quarter of 2013 - that was with Opera PRESTO, before 15 even existed.

I contrast this to your statement from 2-3 months ago where you expected Opera Next's userbase to surpass the highest that Opera 12 ever had. (...) As the data in the financial reports doesn't seem to broken down by version of the client, forgive me for recognising the possibility that a considerable percentage of those 51 million users are ones who are still on Opera 12
Check the Q4 2013 presentation, Opera 15+ already has more users than the Presto versions.
About the desktop browser they say "Major part of user base is now on the new product".

You also have to consider 15+ is not being delivered via auto-update so a lot of users don't even know about it. If it was we should be seeing an even higher adoption of 15+.

What I do know objectively is the huge drop in functionality compared to classic Opera, where that was its unique selling point.
The unique selling point that kept it at >2% market share? The one that made the user base fall long before Opera 15 appeared?

You'd have to forgive people for suspecting a much-reduced development team though -- classic Opera was a massive beast of a software
It took years for it to be built with all that features and people don't realize that.
Additionally they don't want to reintroduce all the features Opera had before, only the most relevant (subjective) and then keep on differentiating with other things.

So the numbers were already dropping before Next, I still don't see it making much of a difference. I would assume that in this case, the dwindling numbers were the reason why management decided it was time to do something, and the idea they came up with was a clean break and complete re-write. It was a bad idea, as evidenced by the fact that it didn't break their fall.

We'll have to take Opera's word at the ratio of v12 vs. v15+ users. And I just don't see many new people finding their way to Opera anymore, people who didn't already know it from Presto days. Not now that it is all but indistinguishable from Chrome, when the name Chrome is on everybody's tongue and in every newspaper, and the people who remember Opera from the days when the browser field was less crowded are few. So they had problems with their market share before the decision to go Next – my point is, they still had a relatively firm grip on the power user userbase, which they could have built on. Instead, they made the risky decision of stopping to consider them, and trying to enter a much bigger but extremely overcrowded market. It's a huge gamble that almost no one ever manages to make work for them.

It took years to build the classic Opera – I realise that, and that's exactly my point. They threw all of those years of experience and refinement in the bin. A complete rewrite is the wrong way even if you want to drastically reduce functionality – which in itself is usually a terrible idea, because features get introduced for a reason, and once people start using them they don't like them being taken away from them. You are very right that it is subjective which features are relevant, but all features will have been relevant to some users, and removing any single one loses you some users. Removing most previous unique features deals a big blow.


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These days, other browsers are getting slimmer, but this is bloat and slower.

Did anyone feel this way?

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They have to install all the tracking for AliExpress, Facebook, WhatsApp, etc. Where do you think they get their money from?


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It was a good browser, still is a decent one, but it behaves in a unacceptable way: makes itself the default browser, creates a quick launch icon, creates a desktop icon and, of course, all of this without asking any permission. It even recreates a desktop icon when it has been deleted! That last one made me uninstall it for good.

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**Pros ** - Built-in Adblocker, Battery Saver, Cu...

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Pros

  • Built-in Adblocker, Battery Saver, Currency Converter, Mouse Gestures, Opera Turbo, Sidebar ,Themes, Video Popout, VPN, Visual Bookmark with Recycle Bin

Cons

  • require user prompt to install from chrome web store
  • opera link was unable to sync extensions

[Edited by Shojimeguro, January 19]

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Fast
Very Nice Interface
lightweight compared to Firefox
Ability to add Chrome extensions
Built-in Adblocker
Free VPN with Unlimited Bandwidth

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I consider Opera discontinued

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Opera has turned into chrome-clone since ver15. Totally abandoned its previous browser engine. Removed everything for Opera to be unique and better than others. Since ver15 it is an unfinished chrome.

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maybe its like that, but there is a whole difference between chrome and opera, not all the linux distros the same, they have something in common but differ anyway, Opera has specialists with better knowledge than me and you and other users, its not just because Blink is fast and popular, but because they find it the best engine for their next versions, thats all

Really? Opera 53 is Current! Opera 54 is Comming! I have 55 Dev!

Really? Opera 53 is Current! Opera 54 is Comming! I have 55 Dev!


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Good on android, a nightmare on windows since recent times. The completely intrusive "silent" update can't be disabled and at each and every update it pushes itself into the taskbar (although it wasn't ever the default browser and with such a behavior it will never be) and also pushes AliExpress on the quick launch new tab bar.
Well, if you get their money (and other probably illegal or at the very least immoral stuff mentioned on this site as well), then that's what matters for you; not your users. Too bad. Another company with integrity once ago becomes a slave (so as to not use another term) to panoptic money grubbing practices.

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