Eclipse Reviews

Eclipse as in eclipsing all other IDEs

about Eclipse · · Helpful Not helpful 2 Helpful

Humans are all about choices. Some like this and that and the other. Having many options is good as not every piece of software will please absolutely everybody. Regardless of your opinions of Eclipse you cannot deny the fact it's the most popular and flexible of all IDEs as is able to host almost every popular programming language and able to use every popular addon/plugin out there. So good luck manually setting up Gradle scripts and what not. I pick Eclipse all I gotta do is click install Gradle start coding. Easy. They tell me if I do the scripts manually I might learn a few things. Sure. Until the next best thing comes along then you gotta learn that. I like it simple. Focus on what's important ie coding. Time is limited.

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about Eclipse · · Helpful Not helpful

Excellent! Thank you, people,

From a satisfied customer

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Best IDE with complication

about Eclipse · · Helpful Not helpful

This is the best IDE with most complication. It's support almost every popular programming languages. Lots of plugins. Lots of preferences and so on.

[Edited by playablegraphs, December 22]

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Battleship IDE for unforgiving language: Java

about Eclipse · · Helpful Not helpful

Note: I am specifically discussing JBoss Developer Studio, which is Eclipse with some pre-installed plugins.

After years of evading any interaction with Java, I'm playing catch-up. Eclipse is proving crucial in minding the myriad details of Maven, class relationships, and the sheer redundant verbosity of Java syntax.

Bloated? For Python or PHP or JavaScript, yeah. When working in those languages I still prefer a code editor (e.g., Sublime or Notepad++) over a full-on IDE.

However, Java's fundamental nature can't be corralled by "just" a code editor. Don't bring a knife to a gunfight.

The basic difference between Eclipse and NetBeans is that Eclipse is more of a framework that hosts different language- and task-specific components; the Java editor and the Python editor are really different applications, not a single editor with different settings. Eclipse and NetBeans have different design philosophies, and that's fine. I happen to like Eclipse's philosophy.

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For Linux I rather Netbeans

about Eclipse and NetBeans · · Helpful Not helpful

First of all, I haven't used this two (Eclipse & NetBeans) in Windows. Only in Linux, but for this last SO, I certainly rather NetBeans over Eclipse, since it's more Linux-Friendly.
So far, I have had no problem at all running NetBeans under Linux, but in Eclipse, I had weird behaviour/bug sometimes, that's why I decided to use NetBeans as default.

It's because eclipse works better with oracle java than with openjdk, you will see that with this last one, parts like windowbuilder doesn't work (it doesn't work neither if you are using compiz manager, with ubuntu unity). Anyway I have seen that the last versions of eclipse are less limux-friendly until they fix it, I think that windows is the main platform, swing

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Feels bloated

about Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA · · Helpful Not helpful

I dislike that many projects use this as there preferred development environment (e.g. Android).
When I ever use an IDE then it's IntelliJ Idea for Java or Visual Studio for Windows.

Might feel bloated but it also has a huge user base making it very popular among plugins, add-ons and developing languages hence the most flexible of all of them. I mean you could go on Vi in text mode Linux and try to manually setup everything yourself good luck with that. Optionally you could just go hexadecimal and binary and write everything yourself from scratch.

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