Alternatives to Qwant for all platforms with any license

Platforms

Show 24 less popular platforms
  • Startpage icon

    Startpage

    Startpage.com is a search engine that fetches results from the Google search engine without saving the users' IP addresses or giving any personal user information to...

    Free Web / Cloud Android iPhone Android Tablet iPad

    No features added Add a feature
  • Searx icon

    Searx

    Searx is a metasearch engine, aggregating the results of other search engines while not storing information about its users. Why use Searx? - Searx may not offer...

    Open Source Linux Web / Cloud Self-Hosted

    No features added Add a feature
  • Bing icon

    Bing

    Bing (formerly Live Search, Windows Live Search, and MSN Search) is the current web search engine (advertised as a "decision engine") from Microsoft. Bing...

    Free Windows Web / Cloud Android iPhone Windows RT ... Windows Phone iPad

    No features added Add a feature
  • YaCy icon

    YaCy

    YaCy is a free search engine that anyone can use to build a search portal for their intranet or to help search the public internet. When contributing to the world-wide...

    Open Source Mac Windows Linux Web / Cloud

  • ixquick icon

    ixquick

    Ixquick protects your privacy! The only search engine that does not record your IP address. You have a right to privacy. Your search data should never fall into the...

    Free Web / Cloud Android iPhone Android Tablet iPad

  • Ecosia icon

    Ecosia

    Ecosia is a green search engine that donates at least 80% of its profits from search ad revenue and online shopping to a reforestation program, currently in Burkina...

    Free Web / Cloud

    No features added Add a feature
  • Yandex.Search icon

    Yandex.Search

    Yandex is the fastest growing search engine in the world, serving primarily Russia (the largest and most popular) and other countries formerly part of the Soviet Union....

    Free Windows Web / Cloud Android iPhone Android Tablet ... Telegram iPad

    No features added Add a feature
  • Gigablast icon

    Gigablast

    Gigablast is a powerful, opensource, new search engine that does real-time indexing! Features Scalable to thousands of servers. Has scaled to over 12 billion web...

    Open Source Web / Cloud Self-Hosted

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  • DeeperWeb icon

    DeeperWeb

    Easily navigate through Google Search results using a fast, simple and useful Tag-Cloud technique.

    Open Source Web / Cloud Firefox

    No features added Add a feature
  • MillionShort icon

    MillionShort

    Million Short is an experimental web search engine (really, more of a discovery engine) that allows you to REMOVE the top million (or top 100k, 10k, 1k, 100) sites from...

    Free Web / Cloud

    No features added Add a feature

Qwant Comments

You've little to lose and a lot to gain. Consider switching.

Positive Comment by JohnFastman
about Qwant and Startpage, DuckDuckGo, Google Search 6 days ago

If you live in the Western world, Google dominates the internet, search included. There's a huge amount wrong with Google, from its compliance with totalitarian censorship, to the fact it profits at the expense of users' privacy, its tax-avoidance, filter bubbling, and much, much else besides. I hate to point out the obvious at this point, but you'll notice that genuinely all of these directly affect important aspects of democracy. Sorry: That's not me, it's just that information, taxes and privacy are inherently at the core of democracy.

Qwant is a comparatively new search engine which promises not to leverage your privacy to profit. It doesn't - as Google does - compile your searches, catalogue your interests, cross-reference your website visits (to say nothing of email contents, youtube views, bookmarks, contacts, phone apps and everything you've done on Chrome). Nor does Qwant leverage all this information to build up a profile of you as an individual, as Google does. Nor does it use that information for its own profit. You might remind yourself of historical examples where an organization has compiled profiles of individuals for its own benefit. And how those organizations related to democracy.

For going against that trend Qwant deserves a modicum of merit, wouldn't you agree?

So what should I say? That its search is better than Google's? No. But it's near-equal. Damn-near equal. So what price your privacy? What price do you put on the freedom to search, to not be bubbled, to not be profiled as a matter of routine?

And if you don't like Qwant, let me break it to you gently: Bing (see here) and Yahoo search (see here) will not help. Privacy conscious alternatives are:

  • Startpage (looks crappy, but searches well... and that's because it proxies your requests to Google. Google results, no privacy violation.)
  • DuckDuckGo (a privacy-respecting search engine. Read more here.)
  • SearX (a meta search-engine: it gathers results from other search engines and present it to you without revealing to them what you're asking)
  • Disconnect.me (another way of getting results without revealing who you are)

One more thing:
If privacy considerations of this sort are new to you, know that many alternatives exist to the convenience you've been sold by Google. It just takes time to research them and learn why it's important. You can do worse than by starting with www.privacytools.io and advice from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a US non-profit organization advising the public). Don't go thinking that Chrome and Facebook are necessities (or even desirable). You don't have to have every thought and message catalogued by Gmail for their benefit. Ask yourself why things you use are "free". (The answer is because they are using you, in case you're in doubt.)

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News version is really an improvement

Positive Comment by mll
about Qwant and Google Search May 2015

and makes it a real contender for google Serach. I've been trying it for a couple of hours, and I just switched it to my default search engine.

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