Corel AfterShot Pro Reviews

Recommended 1 Helpful

Positive Review by Anamon
about Corel AfterShot Pro and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Mar 2014

Definitely blows Adobe Lightroom out of the water, and not just as far as value for money is concerned. From interface to functionality to speed, I have no complaints. Based on the old Bibble software, AfterShot Pro is faster, more versatile, more open and extensible, more customer-friendly and, yes, considerably cheaper than Lightroom.

Apart from Lightroom, I have found no other software that has equally powerful and comfortable tagging and cataloguing features, which is what I mainly purchased the software for. There are a lot of applications doing a good job at RAW handling and post-processing, some of them even free or open-source. But for some reason, Lightroom and AfterShot Pro are the only ones who get the metadata aspect right. Of course, the notion of using Lightroom has become absolutely laughable with Adobe's recent changes in licensing. I'm not going to let myself be forced into a time-limited subscription of a software which can be deactivated at any time. If you purchase AfterShot Pro, you own the copy and will be able to use it forever. When there are major updates, you decide freely whether the upgrade is worth the price or not.

As I upgraded to version 3, I was pleasantly surprised to see how development has ramped up again, after it seemed to have stagnated for a while. There are lots of new tools and features (such as a blemish remover or a highly configurable watermarking tool) and the team seem to be active and also listening to customer requests. I particularly like the new extensible lens correction database.

Of course, all the important features are still there, from non-destructive editing to layers support and batch processing. I want to particularly mention what are easily the two killer features for me, that made me choose AfterShot Pro in the first place. One is the fact that the catalogs work with the files as they are stored on your file system. You don't have to hand over control of where and how you store your images to the software. It maintains a database of all the information it needs, and lets you keep your originals where you want. None of that annoying nonsense of importing moves that most tools, Lightroom in particular, force you to do. Second, the fact that the software offers a plugin API, so that if ever you find a tool missing, you have the option of finding a third-party extension, or just writing it (or having it written) yourself.

[Edited by Anamon, September 24 2016]

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